I'm thrilled to share that I am a Yaddo Fellow in 2017

I curated the solo debut of Monica Palma's work

Wish Me Good Luck

Show opens on November 5 through December 4, 2016

Performance at 7pm

 

My studio and Ortega y Gasset Projects were included in this article

Your Concise Guide to Gowanus Open Studios 2016, Hyperallergic, October 13, 2016 by Benjamin Sutton

The New York Artist-Run Galleries

You Need To Know

Part I

 

Ortega y Gasset Projects, the curatorial collective of which I am a member was featured in Artsy as a gallery you need to know!

November 2015

 

 

 

Art Critic, writer and curator, Benjamin Sutton highlights my work in his Hyperallergic coverage of Gowanus Open Studios 2015.

Sweet Talker, 2015, Watercolor, acrylic and sand on yupo paper, mounted on wood

September 29, 2015, I moderated a NYC Creative Salon discussion about Labor in the creative field at the Old American Can Factory in Gowanus, Brooklyn. It was an expansive, thought provoking discussion. Participants included: Lauren Frances Adams (via Skype), Doug Barrett, Eric Hibit, Andrew Prayzner and Sarah Rushford (via Skype). The link to our discussion is live. You can hear the entire 1.5 hour discussion while you sip on a bubbly beverage and take a long bath!

selected work: Flight, 14" x 11", Oil on linen, 2014 and Soggy Claws and Mazes, 12" x 9", Oil on linen, 2014

Studio open to the public October 17-18, 2015

noon to 6pm

363 Third Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11215

(ground entrance behind Ortega y Gasset Projects)

selected work: Floating Storm, 14" x 11", Oil on linen, 2014

 

Satellite Squared, Migrational Methods & A Romantic Gonzo Gesture

Curated by Zahar Vaks and Nicolle Langille

 

 

September 12, 2015- October 10, 2015

Satellite Contemporary, Las Vegas

 

 

Lauren Adams(Baltimore, MD)

Eleanna Anagnos(Brooklyn, NY)

Joshua Bienko (Knoxville, TN)

Eric Hibit (Queens, NY)

Fritz Horstman (Bethany, CT)

Will Hutnick (Wassaic, NY)

Leeza Meksin (Brooklyn, NY)

Sarah Rushford (Boston, MA)

Zahar Vaks (Brooklyn, NY)

Sheilah Wilson(Granville, OH & Nova Scotia)

 

For our September 2015 exhibition, we bring the work of the Brooklyn- based artist collective,  Ortega y Gasset Projects. OyG is an artist-run curatorial collective and exhibition space in Gowanus, Brooklyn that produces thoughtful programming that reflects the diverse interests of the individual members. As they explain, “the goal of OyG is to mount exhibitions that provoke interpretation and dialogue. In doing so, we participate within a wider forum to disseminate aesthetic experience in new ways and expand our roles, priorities and scope of influence within art culture”. For their exhibition at Satellite, they are influenced by a romanticized idea of Las Vegas via the lens of Hunter S. Thompson's writing, along with influential films, photos and essays. The work that the artists are including echoes multiple entryways of Vegas and its desert surroundings. Some works describe the everyday entwined with psychedelic glamour that one can imagine as the circulatory system of Las Vegas' past and present. Other works feel like remnants of an abandoned mining town in the Nevada desert. Most urgently, they intend to highlight the collaborative hive- mind and satellite process of putting the show together.  Read more about their curatorial approach at http://oygprojects.com/, or research OyG members.

 

 

Love Child OPENS!

Curated by Eleanna Anagnos

June 12, 2015 - July 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

all images © eleanna anagnos, 1998 - 2017. all rights reserved

GAME GENIE

curated by Will Hutnick & Polly Shindler

 

featuring:

 

Eleanna Anagnos,

 

Sharona Eliassaf,

 

Henry Samelson

 

Cameron Welch

 

February 4 – March 5, 2015

 

 

 

opening reception:

Wednesday, February 4, 6 – 9pm

closing reception:

Thursday, March 5, 6 – 8pm

 

Trestle Projects is pleased to announce GAME GENIE, a group exhibition of painting that explores the undefined space where physicality and digitalization overlap.

 

Game Genie was a supplemental tool for original Nintendo that provided a quicker and much easier way to beat the game at hand.  The device plugged into your machine and transported your character into a different space and time.  You were given the opportunity to avoid various levels and obstacles and bypass information in the hopes of completing the game sooner.  The game - and your experience - was being edited as it was being played.  New pieces and fragments were (re)constructed to reinvent the final outcome.

 

GAME GENIE explores the ways in which artists are investigating an undefined space between physicality and virtuality.  By employing common digital technologies – and/or a computer-driven mindset - to create recognizable forms and shapes, the artists in GAME GENIE are altering and subverting the familiar picture plane, and questioning our own perceptions about space, in a way that is unexpected.  Paint acts as a portal to, and away from, virtual networks.  This gray area, this unknown, inter-dimensional space where physicality and digitalization overlap, is being challenged with a critical eye, making the viewer attempt to decipher whether something is painted, collaged, superimposed, digital.  The artists are questioning what is there and not there, reconfiguring shapes and information through their exploration.  Multiple and/or identical forms are created to exist in the same space and time, as if they had been copied and pasted from one surface (or screen) to the other.  Rather than a strict copy, however, the forms and shapes at play are developed specifically and intentionally with the artists’ hand: through loose, sweeping, gestural marks; through incompatible colors forced to interact and harmonize, or produce static; to hand-drawn figures that undulate and shift between different perspectives and dimensions.  These moments are an exploration of an unobtainable, “other” space, as well as a declaration of the present.